Swift Ninja Logo

Lesson 024 – TabBar Navigation

In this lesson, we revisit some iOS navigation techniques. Last time, in Lesson 010, we used the Navigation Controller to move between Views. This time, we use the Tab Bar Controller and take a look at how it works, what happens if you have too many items, how to do custom icons, what you get for free, and what you don’t.

(Make sure to watch in full screen and click the gear icon to set the video quality to its highest level so the text is as legible as possible)
Here is the link for the GitHub repo.

Lesson 023 – Adding an iOS Launch Screen

In this lesson, I show how easy it is to add a Launch/App Loading screen to your iOS application. I also spend a little time explaining the details of how the layout constraints can be used to create the layout that you’re looking for.

(Make sure to watch in full screen and click the gear icon to set the video quality to its highest level so the text is as legible as possible)
Here is the link for the GitHub repo.

Lesson 022 – Passing Functions to Functions in Swift 3

In this lesson, we revisit what we learned in Lesson 005 in light of new breaking changes in Swift 3.

(Make sure to watch in full screen and click the gear icon to set the video quality to its highest level so the text is as legible as possible)
Here is the link for the GitHub repo.

Lesson 021 – Calling Functions in Swift 3

In this lesson, we revisit what we learned in Lesson 004 in light of new breaking changes in Swift 3.


(Make sure to watch in full screen and click the gear icon to set the video quality to its highest level so the text is as legible as possible)
Here is the link for the GitHub repo.

Swift 2.3 Update

Swift Language LogoSwift 2.3 was released on June 12, 2016. While Swift 3 was announced at WWDC the next day, it still isn’t in its final form, so I won’t cover those changes yet. I don’t want to have to be confusing and backtrack if things change in the beta.

The good news for us is that Swift 2.3 doesn’t really have any changes in it that we need to be concerned with in regards to the code that we’ve been writing. The notes from the official Swift Blog say:

“Swift 2.3 is a minor update from Swift 2.2.1. The primary difference between Swift 2.2.1 and Swift 2.3 is that it is intended to be paired with Appleā€™s macOS 10.12, iOS 10, watchOS 3, and tvOS 10 SDKs. It also updates the underlying LLVM and Clang versions to match with those in the Swift 3 compiler.”

That just means that this release is setting us up to be able to use the latest and greatest of Apple’s operating systems across their four platforms (mobile, desktop, tv, and watch).

« Older Entries   Recent Entries »